Eating Disorders

Eating disorders can have a serious impact on a young persons life.  The following documents provide advice for students, teaching staff and other professionals.

 

There are 3 main types of eating disorders, Anorexia, Bulimia and Binge Eating Disorder.

 

Anorexia is a potentially life threatening, psychological disorder which may well be difficult to spot due to the secretive nature of the illness and the secrecy and denial involved.  More prevalent in girls, but can affect girls and boys from all social, ethnic groups.

Bulimia involves eating vast quantities of food, usually in a very short period of time and then inducing vomiting and often using large numbers of laxatives.

Binge Eating is Bulimia without the purging and vomiting which results in rapid weight gain.

Have a look at Jackie's training Courses to help your school's teachers or parents.

Books on Eating Disorders

Contains poems from many eating disorder sufferers and their families. Emma Fulham, ISBN 978-0954584702 
A workbook for helping young people. Alison Eivors and Sophie Nesbitt, ISBN 978-0470021286
Packed with information. Suzanne Abraham and Derek Llewellyn Jones,  ISBN  978-0198509370 
Eating Disorders Guidance for Teachers -Easy read low cost small book. Christine Lewis and Amanda Johnson, ISBN 978-1898538026
A less easy, more psychiatric-based book. Many contributors ISBN 978-0470014639

Advice For Friends of Sufferers

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There are 3 main types of eating disorders, Anorexia, Bulimia and Binge Eating Disorder. Anorexia is a potentially life threatening, psychological disorder which may well be difficult to spot due to the secretive nature of the illness and the secrecy and denial involved.  More prevalent in girls, but can affect girls and boys from all Read More …

Warning Signs and Advice – (c) Jackie Cox

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You never see anorexics eat Dressing in baggy clothes A significant change in apparent appetite An unnatural preoccupation with food and calories An obsession with clothing sizes, mirrors and scales Routine secrecy, e.g. leaving the table immediately after eating Avoiding family meals or events where food is present Excessive exercise Social withdrawal, moodiness Advice for Read More …

Advice to Teaching Staff – (c) Jackie Cox

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What to do if you suspect a pupil has an Eating Disorder Do not promise to keep it confidential, make it clear what the policy on confidentiality is for the school. Report to the designated child protection officer. Do not report it to anyone else without the designated CPO’s knowledge and agreement. Do not try Read More …